Survey: Supply chain issues affect 86 percent of U.S. hotels

Day-to-day cleaning material, linens and F&B most impacted

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AHLA survey
Nearly 80 percent of U.S. hotels have experienced difficulties in operations due to supply chain disruptions, according to a survey from the American Hotel & Lodging Association. More than half, 52 percent, of respondents said the problem became worse over the past three months.

MORE THAN EIGHT in ten hotels in the U.S. experienced difficulties in operations due to supply chain disruptions, according to a survey. Nearly three in four hotel operators say the disruptions are negatively impacting their business revenue.

The American Hotel & Lodging Association (AHLA) conducted the survey among more than 500 AHLA members during Nov. 8 to 22.

More than half, 52 percent, of respondents said that the problem became worse over the past three months, and 74 percent said supply chain issues are having a negative impact on business revenue.

The impact on operations could have repercussions for employment, underscoring the need for targeted federal relief for hotel employees, such as the Save Hotel Jobs Act, according to AHLA.

“Hotels have a complex supply chain that requires regular procurement of a wide range of goods and services each day. And whether it’s production backups or shipping delays, supply chain disruptions are compounding hotels’ existing problems and increasing operating costs during an already tough time,” said Chip Rogers, president and CEO of AHLA. “This survey highlights just how widespread these challenges are for hoteliers. That’s why now is the time for Congress to pass the Save Hotel Jobs Act, so hotel employees can get the relief they need during these difficult times.”

Regarding the types of day-to-day cleaning and housekeeping materials most affected, 85 percent of respondents said the supply of linens and other soft goods and 76 percent said food and beverages. Also, 79 percent said they experienced cost escalation for day-to-day cleaning and housekeeping materials, 77 percent said linens and other soft goods and 77 percent from F&B.

Moreover, respondents to the survey do not expect the supply chain disruptions to be resolved any time soon. Almost half of those surveyed, 46 percent, expect these disruptions to last six months to a year and another 36 percent expecting them to last more than a year.

In a recent report, HotStats said that the Omicron COVID-19 variant could derail the hotel industry’s recovery if countries like the U.S. move forward to tighten testing policies.